Here are several key papers that have provided empirical support for the Body Project and related eating disorder and obesity prevention interventions.

Stice et al., 2006

This is the large-scale efficacy study that compared the Body Project intervention to several alternate interventions aimed at preventing eating disorders.

Stice et al., 2007

This study tested the model underlying the Body Project, showing that reductions in thin-ideal accounted for significant effects of the program.

Stice et al., 2008a

This study examined long-term effects of the Body Project from the first large-scale efficacy trial, showing it reduced eating pathology onset over 3-year follow-up by 60%.

Stice et al., 2008b

This paper reviews the theoretical rationale and empirical support for dissonance-based interventions.

Stice et al., 2009

This study showed that the Body Project was effective when high school staff recruited participants and conducted the groups.

McMillan et al, 2011

This study compared high- and low-dissonance versions of the Body Project; results provide evidence that dissonance induction contributes to intervention effects.

Stice et al., 2011a

This study presented long-term effects for the Body Project when conducted by high school staff, establishing that reductions in eating disorder symptoms persist through 3-year follow-up.

Stice et al., 2011b

This study presented long-term effects for the Body Project when conducted by high school staff, establishing that reductions in eating disorder symptoms persist through 1-year follow-up.

Stice et al., 2012a

This study presents acute effects for Healthy Weight intervention, indicating it reduces eating disorder symptoms and BMI, with strongest effects for women with body image and eating disturbances.

Stice et al., 2012b

This preliminary study shows that a prototype Internet version of the Body Project intervention is as efficacious as the group intervention.

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